All the time when my friend says " I like apples", by "apple" he means a kind of fruit that grows on trees. But the same "apple" may no longer mean a kind of fruit when it is used in a string of words like this: the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. What do you make out of the sentence? Do you think apple here refers to the same fruit that my friend likes? Absolutely not. There are string of words that have a different meaning from the words that compose them. These kind of strings are called idioms. Idioms are the integral part of any language which are directly related to the culture of the people that speak that language. So, by learning idioms we can convey ourselves in a better way in the language we are learning. The purpose of this section is to introduce idioms which are used by the native speakers of English. For the sake of convenience, every idiom has been contextualized so that you can guess the meaning easier. Give it a go.




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Food
food.htm
By S.hashemi
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Colors
colors.htm
By Sara Jafari
boygluehand.jpg
Body
body.htm
By Elaheh Rafatbakhsh
fish.jpg
Animals
animals.htm
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Travel
Travel.htm
By Sara Khosronejad
thermo.jpg
Temperature
Temperature.htm
BySara Ramezani

Mixed
idioms.htm
By Ali kushki
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Health
Health.htm
By Maryam Homayounzadeh
calories-in-an-apple.jpg
Apple
apple.htm
By Hamed Hooman
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Friendship
friendship.htm
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Money
moneyidioms.htm
By Hamid Ranjbar
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Relationship
relationships.htm

By Rasool Ghanbari